Desexing of rabbits can reduce stress, aggression and the chance of cancer.

Desexing of rabbits can reduce stress, aggression and the chance of cancer.

MALE RABBITS
Male rabbits can be castrated at about 10 months of age, once the testes descend into the scrotum.

REASONS TO CASTRATE
Castration is necessary to prevent unwanted pregnancies, especially if you intend to house male and female rabbits together. Male rabbits that are castrated early may sometimes be calmer and less likely to fight with each other.
Additional advantages to castrating young rabbits include decreasing hypersexuality, aggression and dominance behaviour. In some cases (where rabbits are allowed to roam in the house), it can minimize urine marking and promote litter box training.
Older rabbits (1 year and above) can still be castrated but the behavioural benefits from the surgery may be less obvious.

ABOUT THE SURGERY
The procedure is done under general anesthesia and is relatively quick. The surgery has some potential complications like post-operative infection or bleeding, but is usually safe.

POST OPERATIVE CARE
There is minimal post-operative care required. The rabbit will need pain medication by mouth and you will need to observe the rabbit’s appetite and check the wound daily for the first 3-5 days.

MAKING AN APPOINTMENT FOR DESEXING YOUR RABBIT
Call our reception to make an appointment for your rabbit de-sexing. Operations are normally performed on regular weekdays. We do not schedule routine surgeries on weekends and public holidays.

THE DAY OF SURGERY
Ensure that your rabbit is well fed the morning of the surgery and that she is good health – lively with a good appetite and good faecal output (normal size and number of faecal pellets).
Rabbits are different from other animals and people – they can be fed up until they have surgery. They do NOT need to have food withheld.

FEMALE RABBITS
Female rabbits are best spayed at around 10 months. Older female rabbits can be spayed also, but the surgery may be more difficult due to increased fat tissues around the womb. Nevertheless, we still advise spaying of all female rabbits, as long as they are in general good health.

REASONS TO SPAY YOUR RABBIT
Spaying female rabbits decreases aggression during false pregnancy and prevents unwanted pregnancy.
The most important reason for spaying female rabbits is to prevent the occurrence of uterine disorders. These disorders include uterine cancer (a rather common problem in female rabbits older than 3 years old), uterine infection (pyometra), bleeding into the uterus and abnormal glandular development.
These disorders are frequently fatal – uterine cancer can spread to the brain, lungs or liver, which causes organ failure and death.
Signs of uterine disorders include bloody urine, weakness, poor appetite, weight loss and anaemia. These signs may not be obvious until the disease is very advanced.
Abnormal uterine development could also lead to chronic blood loss and eventual death.

ABOUT THE SURGERY
The spay surgery is done under general anesthesia and involves entering the abdomen of the rabbit to remove the ovaries and womb.
Though the surgery is not without risks, it is a relatively safe procedure under experienced hands. Despite the risk we still advise that all female rabbits be spayed to minimise and prevent the above-mentioned diseases.

POST OPERATIVE CARE
There is minimal post-operative care required. The rabbit will need pain medication by mouth and you will need to observe the rabbit’s appetite and check the wound daily for the first 3-5 days.

MAKING AN APPOINTMENT FOR DESEXING YOUR RABBIT
Call our reception to make an appointment for your rabbit de-sexing. Operations are normally performed on regular weekdays. We do not schedule routine surgeries for weekends or public holidays.

THE DAY OF SURGERY
Ensure that your rabbit is well fed the morning of the surgery and that she is good health – lively with a good appetite and good faecal output (normal size and number of faecal pellets).
Rabbits are different from other animals and people – they can be fed up until they have surgery. They do NOT need to have food withheld.

Rabbits